Women in politics analyzed in pop-culture panel

Students+take+notes+as+the+panel+discusses+women+in+politics+on+TV.+

Lydia Sanchez

Students take notes as the panel discusses women in politics on TV.

Neal Hogden, Managing Editor

The UW Oshkosh Women’s Center hosted two politically themed events on Monday to help educate students on the struggles and success stories of women in politics.

The center hosted their 2018 pop culture panel about women in politics on TV on Monday. The panel discussed the roles of women in TV shows like ABC’s “Scandal”, NBC’s “Parks and Recreation” and CBS’s “Madam Secretary,” where politics are at the forefront. The panel then dissected the character’s roles in the show.

The panel consisted of former Wisconsin state Sen. Jessica King, Deputy Mayor of the City of Oshkosh Lori Palmeri, UW Oshkosh political science professor Dr. Dru Scribner, Oshkosh Student Association President Ronisha Howard and women’s and gender studies professor Morgan Stewart.

King said the barrier of women in politics is breaking down, but the numbers are still low.

“Women are eight percent of national leaders, two percent of the world’s presidential posts and 23.3 percent in legislative positions,” King said. “There’s a great opportunity for young women to find their space, own their voice and participate.”

Former WI state senator Jessica King talks about Leslie from Parks & Rec.

Lydia Sanchez
Former WI state senator Jessica King talks about Leslie from Parks & Rec.

Women’s Center Director and Event Coordinator Dr. Alicia Johnson said she hopes students realize that they can be represented if they just go out and vote.

“We decided to have this be the topic because we’re a week ahead of the midterm elections, and we want students to be reminded of the power of their voice and to be sure that their voice is heard by going out and voting,” Johnson said.

UWO graduate student Brooke Berrens said students need to take a deeper look at who the candidates they are voting for are and what they represent.

“Representation is really important,” Berrens said. “Who’s being represented by the candidates? Just kind of keep that in mind when you’re viewing media and actually voting and making change in your community.”

The Women’s Center also held their bi weekly Masculinity Monday which is the center’s discussion session on the effects of society on men and the way they act towards women.

This week’s topic was fitting as it looked into political campaigns. The next Masculinity Monday installment will be on Nov. 26 from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Women’s Center.