Paj Ntaub kicks off Asian Heritage Month

Paj Ntaub, a Hmong story cloth, is displayed. The cloths document daily experiences and hardship.

Photos Courtesy of UW Oshkosh Flickr

Paj Ntaub, a Hmong story cloth, is displayed. The cloths document daily experiences and hardship.

Jessica Bukielski, News Writer

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Asian Heritage Month is in full swing at UW Oshkosh, highlighting the importance of diversity on campus and educating students about different cultures.

There are many events coming up on campus this month, including poet Souvankham Thammavongsa on April 10 at 5 p.m., Sushi Night on April 11 at 6 p.m., Baby Steps Film and Talkback on April 22 at 5:30 p.m. and many more.

The event “Paj Ntaub: A Hmong Story Cloth,” kicked off Asian Heritage Month on April 4 at 3:30 p.m. in Reeve Union. Assistant Director of Access and Retention MaiKhou Xiong said this event is a way to honor and celebrate different students’ cultures on campus and help educate others.

“The Hmong story cloth event is a very special event,” MaiKhou Xiong said. “Students felt that it was appropriate to have an event to help share the story of the Hmong story cloth and why it’s so important and what kind of impact that it has on their experience as a student as well as their sense of belonging on campus.”

According to Mai Khou Xiong, story cloths — or paj ntaub in the Hmong native language — comes from a time where people were going through a lot of hardship. The story cloth was a way for Hmong people to document their experiences and their every day life. The one specifically at UWO shows a story starting in China and going from Laos to Thailand where there were refugee camps, and then finally to the United States.

President of the Asian Student Association Alina Xiong said planning for Asian Heritage Month events went very well, and she had the ability to collaborate with other students.

“I have gained a lot of skills in collaborations, marketing and outreach,” Alina Xiong said. “Though our team always works hard to make these events happen, we find it hard to bring people to our events.”

Alina Xiong said she has different goals as a student when planning an event for Asian Heritage Month and she wants to make sure different cultures and countries are properly and accurately represented.

“Although it is important we hold and lead events during Asian Heritage Month, their education is also important, and I would never want their education to be jeopardized due to extracurricular activities,” Alina Xiong said.

Alina Xiong said Asian Heritage Month is just like any other month, but it is a month for Asians to become a better version of themselves.

“Asian Heritage Month is like every other month, where Asian leaders continue to strive and fight injustices and where Asian students continue to persevere in higher education,” Alina Xiong said. “The only significance about it is that it gives outstanding Asian leaders and communities the spotlight they deserve.”

Member of the Hmong Student Union Doua Xiong said she likes celebrating Asian Heritage month because it honors different Asian ethnicities and cultures.

“By celebrating Asian Heritage Month, the different cultures and practices within different Asian ethnicities are recognized and honored,” Doua Xiong said. “Personally, it shows that the University does appreciate diversity and differences and it makes students like me feel proud of our own culture instead of being ashamed for being different.”

Doua Xiong said she believes that students of other ethnicities should attend events for Asian Heritage Month so that they have the ability to learn a lot about a different culture.

“Most importantly I believe Asian Heritage Month unifies relationships and connections,” Doua Xiong said. “Asian Heritage Month events aren’t just for students, staff and faculty who identify as Asian-American, it is for everyone on campus to attend.”

MaiKhou Xiong said this month is important for students to feel included on campus.

“It is being celebrated in many places across the world, and to have something like that here on this campus I think really shows the campus’ commitment to diversity and inclusion,” MaiKhou Xiong said.

Doua Xiong said the different events honoring Asian Heritage Month have given him amazing experiences.

“I am always intrigued by the practices, clothing, facts, food, talent and so much more from different Asian cultures,” Doua Xiong said.

Doua Xiong said Asian Heritage Month is important to her because it’s a month when he can educate people about his culture and feel proud to be an Asian-American.

“Asian Heritage Month is a time of the year where I can celebrate being Asian-American and also see my peers feel proud and happy,” Doua Xiong said. “It is a positive reminder of who I am and the diversity I bring into campus, the country and world.”

Asian Heritage Month is in full swing at UW Oshkosh, highlighting the importance of diversity on campus and educating students about different cultures.

There are many events coming up on campus this month, including poet Souvankham Thammavongsa on April 10 at 5 p.m., Sushi Night on April 11 at 6 p.m., Baby Steps Film and Talkback on April 22 at 5:30 p.m. and many more.

The event “Paj Ntaub: A Hmong Story Cloth,” kicked off Asian Heritage Month on April 4 at 3:30 p.m. in Reeve Union. Assistant Director of Access and Retention MaiKhou Xiong said this event is a way to honor and celebrate different students’ cultures on campus and help educate others.

“The Hmong story cloth event is a very special event,” MaiKhou Xiong said. “Students felt that it was appropriate to have an event to help share the story of the Hmong story cloth and why it’s so important and what kind of impact that it has on their experience as a student as well as their sense of belonging on campus.”

According to Mai Khou Xiong, story cloths — or paj ntaub in the Hmong native language — comes from a time where people were going through a lot of hardship. The story cloth was a way for Hmong people to document their experiences and their every day life. The one specifically at UWO shows a story starting in China and going from Laos to Thailand where there were refugee camps, and then finally to the United States.

President of the Asian Student Association Alina Xiong said planning for Asian Heritage Month events went very well, and she had the ability to collaborate with other students.

“I have gained a lot of skills in collaborations, marketing and outreach,” Alina Xiong said. “Though our team always works hard to make these events happen, we find it hard to bring people to our events.”

Alina Xiong said she has different goals as a student when planning an event for Asian Heritage Month and she wants to make sure different cultures and countries are properly and accurately represented.

“Although it is important we hold and lead events during Asian Heritage Month, their education is also important, and I would never want their education to be jeopardized due to extracurricular activities,” Alina Xiong said.

Alina Xiong said Asian Heritage Month is just like any other month, but it is a month for her to become a better version of herself.

“Asian Heritage Month is like every other month, where Asian leaders continue to strive and fight injustices and where Asian students continue to persevere in higher education,” Alina Xiong said. “The only significance about it is that it gives outstanding Asian leaders and communities the spotlight they deserve.”

Member of the Hmong Student Union Doua Xiong said she likes celebrating Asian Heritage month because it honors different Asian ethnicities and cultures.

“By celebrating Asian Heritage Month, the different cultures and practices within different Asian ethnicities are recognized and honored,” Doua Xiong said. “Personally, it shows that the University does appreciate diversity and differences and it makes students like me feel proud of our own culture instead of being ashamed for being different.”

Doua Xiong said she believes that students of other ethnicities should attend events for Asian Heritage Month so that they have the ability to learn a lot about a different culture.

“Most importantly I believe Asian Heritage Month unifies relationships and connections,” Doua Xiong said. “Asian Heritage Month events aren’t just for students, staff and faculty who identify as Asian-American, it is for everyone on campus to attend.”

MaiKhou Xiong said this month is important for students to feel included on campus.

“It is being celebrated in many places across the world, and to have something like that here on this campus I think really shows the campus’ commitment to diversity and inclusion,” MaiKhou Xiong said.

Doua Xiong said the different events honoring Asian Heritage Month have given him amazing experiences.

“I am always intrigued by the practices, clothing, facts, food, talent and so much more from different Asian cultures,” Doua Xiong said.

Doua Xiong said Asian Heritage Month is important to her because it’s a month when he can educate people about his culture and feel proud to be an Asian-American.

“Asian Heritage Month is a time of the year where I can celebrate being Asian-American and also see my peers feel proud and happy,” Doua Xiong said. “It is a positive reminder of who I am and the diversity I bring into campus, the country and world.”