Twelve tribes represented at annual powwow

Lydia Westedt, News Reporter

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For the second year in a row, UW Oshkosh hosted the Wisconsin Powwow Hall of Fame, which took place on Nov. 3 in Albee Hall.

Nearly 1,000 people were in attendance, according to American Indian Student Services Coordinator Dennis Zack.

According to Zack, the powwow had representation this year from all 12 of Wisconsin’s Tribal Nations.

At the powwow, students and community members were invited to attend and learn about Native American culture by watching tribal powwow dances, listening to drummers and singers and trying indigenous food.

Zack said the powwow hits the center of the target when it comes to educating and promoting Native American culture.

“UWO is fortunate, as many other universities don’t have powwows,” Zack said. “Many times, this is the only way that students, faculty, staff and community members have the opportunity to be exposed and experience such a powerful cultural event.”

“At a predominantly white institution, American Indian students are proud to show a piece of their heritage,” Zack said. “With knowledge comes understanding and with understanding comes acceptance.”

This year, Marin “Mark” Webster Denning was inducted into the Wisconsin Powwow Hall of Fame. He was inducted under the theme “Land Defender Water Protector,” according to Zack.

The Inter-Tribal Student Organization, which picks the theme every year, chose “Missing and Murdered Women” as next year’s theme.

“The powwow at UWO has been going on and off since the 1980s, depending on availability of American Indian students and help of faculty and staff,” Zack said.

Thanks to the help of the Center for Equity and Diversity, AISS and the ITSO, the powwow has been happening rather consistently for the past ten years, according to Zack.

On Nov. 21 the ITSO will be holding an informational panel called “Ask an Indian,” where students are encouraged to attend and ask their questions about common Native American misconceptions and stereotypes.

The event will take place in Reeve Ballroom B and C from 5 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.