The Advance-Titan

FIXED: How did this police officer accidentally overdose?

Abrahamson

Joseph Schulz, Managing Editor

October 28, 2020

“It was during the summer of 2017. It was super hot outside, and we were dispatched to an apartment complex. A male was in a car and wasn’t breathing. I was the first to arrive in a line of squad cars. I’m grabbing onto his shirt, around his armpits, just trying to get him out of the car. EMTs...

FIXED: ‘Thank you for saving my life’

FIXED: 'Thank you for saving my life'

Jack Tierney, FIXED Writer

October 28, 2020

The video showed grainy black and white images of a lifeless body lying on the ground as semi-trucks and motorists passed by. White clouds of condensation blew from the officers’ mouths as they moved like skilled professionals in the frozen winter night to save a life. The radio calls of the dis...

FIXED: Former UW football star talks addiction

FIXED: Former UW football star talks addiction

Natalie Dillon, FIXED Writer

October 21, 2020

Pain and addiction “What happened to Montee Ball? That is the million-dollar question. That is the question I saw on Google, on Twitter, all the time. I was so anxious to go out and to talk to people, so for me, alcohol was my social lubricant. I fell back on the drinking. Why? Because when I w...

Odd one out: A family fights addiction and for each other

Jenna Washuleski
and her niece, Makayla Brewington, look through a photo
album together. Jenna took legal kinship of Makayla when she was 13.

Kaitlyn Scoville, FIXED Writer

October 21, 2020

Just a day in the life Jenna Washuleski is in her element. Despite the chaos of kids running around at the Boys and Girls Club of Oshkosh, she glides in with a special guest for a H.O.P.E. Group — Hold On, Pain Ends. Montee Ball, former Wisconsin Badger and Denver Bronco running back, came to share h...

Brenda: Wisconsin is ‘what we needed to get clean’

Brenda: Wisconsin is ‘what we needed to get clean’

Joseph Schulz, Managing Editor

October 14, 2020

As told to Joseph Schulz “What led me to drugs was losing my kids — the pain of it. I was like, ‘Well, I tried pot and I didn't get addicted. I tried acid and I didn't get addicted. Why would I get addicted to heroin if I just did it once?’ While I was using, I needed money, so I shoplifted. When I got arre...

Responsibility at the heart of Nick’s recovery

Responsibility at the heart of Nick’s recovery

Gabrielle Fischer, FIXED Writer

October 14, 2020

As told to Gabrielle Fischer Pain and addiction “My mother was a heroin addict. When I was 7, she dropped me off at a place called the Friendship House in Pennsylvania. It was supposed to be for the weekend, but she didn’t come back until I was 10. By then, I had ADHD and was getting in trouble every...

Kessler: ‘By the time I was 12, I was a full-blown alcoholic’

Chris and his cat, Rommel, whom he adopted after Mr. Pooh died. Chris credits Mr. Pooh for saving
his life after the cat came up to him and rubbed against his leg, giving him a moment of clarity just
before he was about to kill himself.

Neal Hogden, FIXED Writer

October 14, 2020

A Tumultuous Childhood At 6 years old, most children are experiencing a lot of firsts, whether it’s their first time losing a tooth, their first grade on an assignment, or their first sleepover. For Chris Kessler, at 6 years old he had his first experience with marijuana and alcohol. ...

FIXED: Family at the heart of Myron’s recovery

FIXED photos by UW Oshkosh alumnus Michael Cooney or provided by FIXED participants
Thanks to the Winnebago County Drug Court, Myron Batiste has become a devoted father to his two daughters.

Joseph Schulz, Managing Editor

October 7, 2020

Myron Batiste shook his head and laughed at the mugshot showing a sullen man with dead eyes, staring into the void. Wearing his best shirt and tie, Myron was laughing because he is no longer the same man in that photo. On this day, Oct. 10, 2019, Myron is one of four people to complete the Winnebago County Drug Court program. The 54-year-old Oshkosh man held his daughters, Krisci...

Lacy: ‘Treatment was never going to be enough’

FIXED photos by UW Oshkosh alumnus Michael Cooney and FIXED participants — Lacy Lacy appears in Winnebago County Drug Court before Circuit Court Judge Karen Seifert. She was addicted to opioids since her daughter was 2 years old.

Jelissa Burns, FIXED Writer

October 7, 2020

Pain and addiction “When my first daughter was 2, I got addicted to opioids. I had never done them before, but then I broke a bone in my foot and I got a kidney infection in the same three-month span. I was prescribed Vicodin twice by my doctor, and by the time I was finished with my second prescr...

Winnebago County Judge Scott Woldt, as told to Leo Costello

Judge Scott Woldt talks to Nicolas, a Drug Court graduate on the day of graduation.

Leo Costello, FIXED Writer

September 30, 2020

"I started [working as a judge] in January of 2004 and I quickly learned that the majority of the people that came in front of me were here with drug and alcohol-related issues, so I knew there was a problem with drugs and alcohol. Before I became a judge, you think it is [a problem], but you reall...

Independent Student Newspaper of UW Oshkosh Campuses
FIXED